November Round Up

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Photo attrib. Harry McGregor, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0

Staff Activity 

Dr Sarah Easterby-Smith gave an evening talk on 3rd October to the Friends of St Andrews Botanic Garden, entitled ‘Botany and the Plant Trade in the Late
Eighteenth Century’

Dr James Nott is quoted in the article ‘Looking back on the dance hall days’ on the BBC Scotland website from 7th October

Chandrika Kaul was a research historian for a programme on Hobson-Johnson and the British Raj on The One Show, BBC 1, on 11th October

Riccardo Bavaj gave an interview on Nazi ideology, the SS, and the Wewelsburg for the documentary series Sacred Sites, a TileFilms production for the Smithsonian Channel. He also gave an interview on “What is the West?” for the documentary series Lógos, a co-production of ARD-alpha, the German documentary channel, and the Catholic Academy in Munich, which also hosted a public panel discussion on the topic on 23rd October

On 24th October, Tomasz Kamusella delivered the talk ‘Imagining the Nation:
Ontological and Epistemic Objectivity’ in the Institute for European Studies,
University of Malta. On 27th October, he spoke of ‘The Forgotten 1989 Ethnic
Cleansing of Communist Bulgaria’s Turks: A Yugoslav Connection?’ for the M.A.
Programme in Humanitarian Action, Department of International Relations,
University of Malta

On 25th October Chandrika Kaul delivered a public lecture on ‘The BBC and
India: War, Independence and Partition’, at the India International Centre, New
Delhi

On 23rd October Professor Richard Whatmore gave a talk at the Cambridge History of Political Thought seminar on ‘The End of Enlightenment: death and
the philosophers, 1776-1809’. He also gave a talk entitled ‘What happened to classical republicanism?’ at the conference Studying the Enlightenment: perspectives from Intellectual History and the History of Philosophy at the University of Lausanne on 28th October

On 2nd November the Financial Review published an article by Professor Andrew
Pettegree entitled ‘Martin Luther: a heedless changer of history’

On 4th November Dr Margaret Connolly gave a paper entitled ‘Private Piety and
the Public Record: Old Books, New Readers, and the Reach of Reform’, as part of the Reformation on the Record conference at The National Archives, Kew

On 7th November Professor Colin Kidd gave the Raleigh Lecture at the British
Academy on the subject of ‘The Scottish Enlightenment and the Matter of Troy’

On 8th November Dr Emily Michelson gave a public lecture at the British School
at Rome entitled ‘Walking Conversionary Rome’

On 10th November Dr Justine Firnhaber-Baker gave a paper, ‘Affective
Government after the French Political Crisis of 1356-58’ at Exclusión y Disciplina
Social en la Ciudad Medieval Europea/14th International Meeting of the Middle
Ages in Najéra, Spain

On 14th November Dr Chandrika Kaul debated the validity of historical
monuments in contemporary Scotland on Time Travels, BBC Radio Scotland

On 29th November Dr Akhila Yechury was quoted in the article ‘Retracing the
country’s forgotten French connection’ on The Hindu website

Publications

Riccardo Bavaj, ‘Life, History, and Political Modernism’, in a forum
on ‘Intellectual and Artistic Responses to Early Fascism—the Historians’
Perspective’, The German Quarterly 90 (2017), No. 3

Tom Dawson, Courtney Nimura, Elias Lopez-Romero, and Marie-Yvane Daire
(eds), Public Archaeology and Climate Change (Oxbow, 2017)

T. Kinnaird, T. C. Dawson, D. Sanderson, D. Hamilton, A. Cresswell, and R.
Rennell, ‘Chronostratigraphy of an eroding complex Atlantic Round House, Baile
Sear, Scotland’, The Journal of Coastal and Island Archaeology (Nov 2017), Latest
Articles, 15 p.

E. L. Graham Allsop,  T. C. Dawson, and J. Hambly, ‘Learning from loss: eroding
coastal heritage in Scotland’, Humanities (Nov 2017), 6,4,19 p. 87.

José Luis Garcia, Chandrika Kaul, Filipa Subtil, Alexandra Santos (eds.), Media
and the Portuguese Empire (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)

Joanna Hambly, Michael Geoffrey Arrowsmith, and Marcus Abbott, ‘A Digital
Future for the Wemyss Caves, Scotland’, British Caves Research Association
(December 2017): 18-22.

Tomasz Kamusella, Motoki Nomachi, and Catherine Gibson (eds), Central Europe
Through the Lens of Language and Politics: On the Sample Maps from the Atlas of
Language Politics in Modern Central Europe (Slavic-Eurasian Research Center,
Japan, 2017)

Dr Tomasz Kamusella and Finex Ndhlovu (eds), The Social and Political History of
Southern Africa’s Languages (Palgave Macmillan UK, 2017)

Colin Kidd and Gerard Carruthers (eds), Literature and Union: Scottish Texts,
British Contexts (Oxford University Press, 2018)

Elena Marushiakova and Vesselin Popov, ‘Orientalism in Romani Studies: The
Case of Eastern Europe’, in Hristo Kyuchukov and William New (eds), Language
of Resistance: Ian Hancock’s Contribution to Romani Studies (Lincom Europa, 2017):
187-237.

Elena Marushiakova and Vesselin Popov, ‘Rethinking Roma Holocaust: Victims
or/and Victors’, in Thomas M. Buchsbaum and Sławomir Kapralski (eds), Beyond
the Roma Holocaust: From Resistance to Mobilisation (Universitas, 2017)

About standrewshistory
With over forty full time members of staff researching and teaching on European, American and Asian history from the dawn of the Middle Ages to the present day, the School of History at the University of St Andrews has one of the finest faculty and diverse teaching programmes of any School of History in the English speaking world. The School boasts expertise in Mediaeval and Modern History, from S cotland to Byzantium and the Americas to the Middle East and South Asia.Thematic interests include religious history, urban history, transnationalism, historiography and nationalism. The School of History prides itself on small group teaching and tutorials allowing for in depth study and supervision tailored to secure the best from each student. Cutting edge research combined with teaching excellence offer a dynamic and intellectually stimulating environment for the study of History.

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