Summer Round Up

News

519qpjslulL._AC_US218_Congratulations to Mlitt student Ashley Atkins and Dr Malcolm Petrie for winning the Royal Historical Society Rees Davies Prize and David Berry Prize respectively!

Congratulations also  to Arthur der Weduwen, who has been awarded the James D. Forbes Prize.  The prize is awarded to a student collector who has assembled a collection of books, printed ephemera, manuscripts or photographs, tied together by a common theme. Arthur was awarded the prize for his developing collection of the everyday books of the Dutch Golden Age.

 

Staff Activity

9781138195837Andrew Pettegree appeared in the documentary Sing, Fight, Cry, Pray: Music of the reformations

The USTC hosted the Printed Book in Central Europe Conference

On July 25, Professor Roger Mason and Principal Sally Mapstone took part in the roundtable ‘Literary Culture in Medieval and Renaissance Scotland: Perspectives and Patterns’ at the International Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Literature and Language

Dr Emily Michelson recommended her favourite neighbourhoods in Rome in the Times Higher Education

On August 24-5, the Spatial History and Its Sources workshop took place

James Palmer was a guest on BBC Radio 4’s Take it to the Brink on August 27

Recent Publications

The Future of Early Modern Scotland Conference has posted its video proceedings online

Rory Cox, ‘Gratian’, in Daniel R. Brunstetter, Cian O’Driscoll (eds), Just War Thinkers: From Cicero to the 21st Century, (Routledge, 2017)

Timothy Greenwood, ‘A Contested Jurisdiction: Armenia in Late Antiquity’ in E. Sauer (ed.), Sasanian Persia: Between Rome and the Steppes of Eurasia (Edinburgh University Press, 2017)

— ‘Armenian traditions in ninth and tenth-century Byzantium: Basil I, Constantine VII and the Vita Basilii’ in I. Toth, & T. Shawcross (eds.), The Culture of Reading In Byzantium: Festschrift for Professors Elizabeth and Michael Jeffreys (Cambridge University Press, 2017)

Bridget HealA Magnificent Faith: Art and Identity in Lutheran Germany (OUP, 2017)

John Hudson, ‘Emotions in the early common law (c. 1166–1215)‘ Journal of Legal History, (38.2), pp. 130-154.

Caroline Humfress, ‘Gift-giving and inheritance strategies in late Roman law and legal practice’, in O-A Rønning, H Møller Sigh & H Vogt (eds.), Donations, Inheritance and Property in the Nordic and Western World from Late Antiquity until Today. (Routledge, 2017)

Tomasz Kamusella, ‘The rise and dynamics of the normative isomorphism of language, nation, and state in Central Europe’ . in M Flier & A Graziosi (eds.), The Battle for Ukrainian: A Comparative Perspective (Harvard University Press, 2017), pp. 415-451.

Dimitri Kastritsis, ‘Legend and historical experience in fifteenth-century Ottoman narratives of the past’ in P Lambert & B Weiler (eds.), How the Past was Used: Historical Cultures, c. 750-2000 (Oxford University Press, 2017) 9781474401012_1

Chandrika Kaul, ‘Gallipoli, media and commemorations during 2015 select perspectives‘ Media History, 1-27.

Konrad Lawson, ‘Between Postoccupation and Postcolonial: Framing the Recent Past in the Philippine Treason Amnesty Debate, 1948’ in Kerstin von Linged (ed.), Debating Collaboration and Complicity in War Crimes Trials in Asia, 1945-1956 (Palgrave, 2017)

Gillian Mitchell, ‘’Mod Movement in Quality Street Clothes’: British Popular Music and Pantomime, 1955-1975’, New Theatre Quarterly XXXIII Part 3 (August 2017): pp. 254-276.

Richard WhatmoreSaving republics by moving republicans: Britain, Ireland and ‘New Geneva’ during the Age of Revolutions History, (102.351) pp. 386-413.

 

 

 

The Future of Early Modern Scottish Studies

Blog written by Dr Kelsey Jackson-Williams

One of the best things about any corner of academia is the community.  Whether you study Shakespeare or dolphins or Italian volcanoes there’s always that group of similarly-minded scholars with whom you correspond, chat to, argue with, and collectively build the field.  Scottish studies is no different; indeed, its small size has traditionally meant that the community surrounding it is strong and close-knit (though not without the occasional squabble).  It was a great pleasure, then, to organise – along with Kimberly Sherman and Andrew Carter – a conference, held in St Andrews, drawing together part of that community in January 2017.

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The general roundable: “Where do we go from here?”

The Future of Early Modern Scottish Studies”, as we grandiosely called it, was meant to be more than just another opportunity to chat about our research.  We had the usual twenty-minute papers, yes, but we also had lightning talks and discussion sessions focused on how we could develop as a discipline, what could and should be done to make that happen, and how our small neuk of the academy interacted with the humanities as a whole.  It was a fantastic two days, with twenty-two speakers from across Europe and America present, and I hope that everyone else learned as much as I did.

But that’s not all.  As I said, we wanted this to be something more lasting than an ordinary conference and to that end we also recorded the proceedings.  These are now available online at the conference website and on Youtube.  Our hope is that they can be watched by interested scholars who weren’t able to be present in person, but also that they can serve as resources for teaching at the undergraduate and masters level, providing an opportunity to expose students to some of the cutting edge research currently going on in the field.

 

Going forward, we’re preparing an edited volume showcasing the work of conference attendees (as well as a couple of other scholars who had hoped to attend the conference but were unavoidably detained).  Our goal is to advance the field, but also to build its community and to help that community better work together and share its discoveries, plans, and ambitions.  What better way forward for Early Modern Scottish studies?

 

The Printed Book in Central Europe Conference

Blog written by PhD student Drew Thomas

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From left to right: Dr Howard Louthan, Dr Jolanta Rzegocka, Polish Ambassador Arkady Rzegocki, Professor Mapstone, Drew Thomas, Professor Andrew Pettegree

The St Andrews Book Project in the School of History, along with the Centre for Austrian Studies at the University of Minnesota, hosted its annual conference this year from 29 June to 1 July. The conference theme was The Printed Book in Central Europe. Scholars from across Europe and America spoke on the rise of the printing press predominantly in lands east of the Holy Roman Empire. The Polish Embassy in London sponsored Polish scholars to attend the conference and the Polish Ambassador, His Excellency Arkady Rzegocki, attended the conference accompanied by his wife, Dr Jolanta Rzegocka.

Hosted in Parliament Hall, the conference was one of the largest in years with around sixty attendees. The twenty-seven papers, spread over two and half days, provided many stimulating conversations. The conference prides itself on not having parallel sessions, which greatly enhances the quality of the question and answer periods with so many specialists in the audience.

The conference began with a panel focusing on the transition from manuscript culture to print culture. Later in the day there were sessions focusing on printing in Transylvania and printing for the Jewish community. Friday’s panels focused on the usage of woodcuts and engravings in central European printing, as well as the effects of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation. The conference concluded on Saturday with James Brophy of the University of Delaware, who spoke on printers’ reluctance to adopt the steam press in the 19th century and the importance that the hand press continued to play in oppositional political print.

The Polish Embassy graciously hosted a wine and beer reception, which featured a marvelous display by Special Collections of treasures from its holdings relating to the conference theme. University Principal Professor Sally Mapstone spoke to the guests on the history of St Andrews’ relationship with Poland, such as the more than 40,000 Scots who immigrated to Poland during the 17th century and the number of Polish soldiers who settled in St Andrews following the Second World War. The latter is memorialized by various monuments in town, including the bust of General Sikorski, the Prime Minister of the Polish Government-in-Exile and Commander-in-Chief of the Polish forces.

IMG_1933The Special Collections exhibit featured several items from the University’s collection relating to Polish history. One of the popular items was a 1599 manuscript of John Payton’s A Relation of the Kingdome of Polonia and the United Provinces of the Crowne. It was the first English account of Poland-Lithuania’s politics, law, and administration, culture, and diplomatic relations. Although it was thought to have only survived in a single copy at the British Library, a new copy surfaced for sale in May 2013 and was acquired by the St Andrews University Library.

Also on display was a 1543 first edition of Nicolaus Copernicus’ De Revolutionibus, published by Johann Petreius in Nuremberg. Copernicus was born in Poland and later a canon at the Polish Frombork cathedra. His work, published just before his death, offered a heliocentric understanding of the solar system. It came into prominence after the trial of Galileo when it was put on the Index of Forbidden Books in 1616, where it would stay until 1820.

The reception ended with Professor Mapstone presenting a copy of A Companion to the Reformation in Central Europe to Ambassador Rzegocki as a token of our thanks for his country’s generosity. The presented volume, published by Brill, was co-edited by Dr Howard Louthan, co-organizer of the conference, and Dr Graeme Murdock from Trinity College, Dublin, who was also in attendance. Many of the contributors to the volume were also present.

The conference was a great success. The proceedings will be published in Brill’s The Library of the Written Word. Next year’s conference on ‘Print and Power’ will take place 21-23 June 2018. For more information, please visit ustc.ac.uk.

Monthly Round Up: April

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Professor Guy Rowlands has presented his inaugural lecture ‘Glamping with Guns. Louis XIV, the Camp of Compiègne, and the Origins of the Modern Military Exercise’.

Professor John Hudson has received the 2017 St Andrews Students’ Association Teaching Award in the ‘Excellence as a Dissertation/Project Supervisor’ category.

Dr Nina Lamal has received a three-month Rome Award from the British School in Rome. She will be at the BSR from January to March 2018 working on collections of seventeenth-century Italian newspapers.

Staff Activity

Dr Chandrika Kaul delivered a public lecture on ‘The BBC and India’ at the FCSH/Nova, Lisbon, on 6th April.

Dr Sarah Easterby-Smith gave a public talk  on 11th April, entitled ‘Science at Sea: Eighteenth-century botanical collecting,’ to the Dollar History Society.

On 15th April, Professor Michael Brown gave the plenary lecture entitled ‘Brexit and “the New British History”: A Late Medieval Perspective’ at the conference Borderlines XXI: Authority in the Medieval and Early Modern World, held at University College Cork.

On 19 April 2017 Dr Tomasz Kamusella delivered a talk on ‘Imagining Nations: Ontological and Epistemic Objectivity’ in the Ivo Pilar Institute of Social Sciences, Zagreb, Croatia.

Two days later Dr Tomasz Kamusella provided a Summing-up Commentary for the international conference on ‘Identities, Categories of Identification, and Identifications between the Danube, the Alps, and the Adriatic,’ held in the National Museum of Contemporary History, Ljubljana, Slovenia.

On 27 April, Dr Ian Bradley and Dr Douglas Galbraith gave the talk ‘Singing the Protestant Faith: the Musical Legacy of the Reformation’ as part of the St Andrews Reformation Institute seminar series.

New Publications

Josh Arthurs, Michael Ebner, and Kate Ferris eds. The Politics of Everyday Life in Fascist Italy. Outside the State? (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)

Bridget Heal and Joseph Koerner, eds. Special Issue: ‘Art and Religious Reform in Early Modern Europe’, Art History, Vol 40, No 2 (2017)

ISHR Reading Weekend 2017

 

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Photo attrib. Ellen Colingsworth, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0

On April 7, the members of the Institute of Scottish Historical Studies traveled from various places to the Burn in Edzell for the highly anticipated ISHR Reading Weekend 2017. Mlitt students, PhDs, postdocs, professors and former lecturers were all part of this fantastic event, and with the sun shining brightly upon arrival, the weekend was off to a great start.

The Friday started gently, as after tea, cakes and dinner, the Mlitt students associated with the Institute presented their preliminary plans for their theses. Sarah Minnear spoke about her exploration of gendered bloodfeud in Scotland, especially the role of women in these conflicts. In examining both urban and noble contexts, a fuller picture of this violent practice will emerge. Daniel Leaver talked about his research about the early twentieth century Scottish National Party, analysing the extent and variety of ideas the party had about Scottish Independence. By studying party leaders’ documents and other political writings, a clearer idea of the legacy of this period for the SNP’s thought can be discussed. After probing questions had been answered, the group dispersed to play games, have a drink and catch up with one another. Read more of this post

Monthly Round Up: February and March

royalheirs.pngNews

Dr Shanti Graheli was recently awarded the Lord Kelvin Adam Smith Fellowship in Comparative Literature and Translation at the University of Glasgow, for a duration of three years. Dr Graheli has also recently won a Major Grant from the Bibliographical Society.

Professor John Hudson has been awarded a European Research Council ‘Advanced Grant’ of over two million Euros for a project entitled ‘Civil Law, Common Law, Customary Law: Consonance, Divergence and Transformation in Western Europe from the late eleventh to the thirteenth centuries’.

Dr Nina Lamal has  received a Major Grant from the Bibliographical Society to conduct research in Italian archives and libraries for her project on Italian newspapers entitled, ‘Late with the news. Italian engagement with serial news publications in the seventeenth century (1639-1700)’.

Staff Activity

The Heirs to the Throne project has now launched a podcast series, based on their Heir of the Month essays.

On 15 March 2017, Dr Tomasz Kamusella delivered the lecture on ‘Imagining the Nation: Ontological and Epistemic Objectivity,’ in the Departamento de Filología Moderna at the Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria in Spain.

Professor Carole Hillenbrand gave a presentation on 15 March to UN ambassadors and delegates in the United Nations Office in Geneva at an event entitled ‘Islam and Christianity, The Great Convergence’, organised by The Geneva Centre for Human Rights Advancement and Global Dialogue.

Dr Bridget Heal has written an article in History Today entitled, ‘Martin Luther and the German Reformation’.

On 23rd March, Professor Elena Marushiakova and Professor Veselin Popov took part in the Workshop ‘Roma Communities in a Global Perspective: Myths, Constructions and Discourses’ in University of Helsinki.

Dr Emily Michelson presented two papers on the 27th and 29th of March: ‘Sixteenth-century Italian Sermons to Jews and to Christians’ at ‘Circulating the Word of God in Medieval and Early Modern Europe: Transformative Preaching in Manuscript and Print (c. 1450 to c. 1550)’ at the University of Hull an ‘Exiting the Roman Ghetto: when was it dangerous and why?’ at ‘Ghettos’, an interdisciplinary research seminar at Birkbeck University of London.

jacqueline rose.pngRecent Publications

Josh Arthurs, Michael Ebner, Kate Ferris eds. The Politics of Everyday Life in Fascist Italy. Outside the State? (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017).

Shanti Graheli, ‘Aldo Manuzio e il Rinascimento Francese’ in M. Infelise (ed.), Aldus and the Making of the Myth (Venice: Marsilio, 2016), pp. 259-274.

Shanti Graheli, ‘Aldo e i suoi lettori’ in T. Plebani (ed.), Aldo al Lettore (Milan/Venice: Unicopli and Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana, 2016), pp. 151-172.

Tomasz Kamusella, Język śląski, naród śląski. Więcej faktów, mniej mitów [The Silesian Language and Nation: More Facts, Fewer Myths], 2017.

Professor Frank Lorenz Müller, Royal Heirs in Imperial Germany: The Future of Monarchy in Nineteenth-Century Bavaria, Saxony and Württemberg  (Palgrave MacMillan, 2017)

Jacqueline Rose, ‘The Godly Magistrate’, in Anthony Milton, ed., The Oxford History of Anglicanism, volume 1: Reformation and Identity, c.1520-1662 (Oxford University Press, 2017).

Monthly Round Up: December and January

colinkidd.jpgNews

The Heirs to the Throne project has launched a podcast series: a selection of the finest ‘Heir of the Month’ essays will be made available as mini-lectures.

A Companion to Intellectual History, edited by Professor Richard Whatmore and Dr Brian Young, has been selected as an ‘Outstanding Academic Title’ by Choice Magazine and has been included in the magazine’s annual list in its  January 2017 issue. Dr John Clark also contributed a chapter to this volume.

Dr James Nott has been awarded a Royal Society of Edinburgh grant for a series of research workshops on how historians can best collaborate with artists, museums and others working in Scottish cultural institutions. The workshops will be held in Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Dundee.

Arthur der Weduwen has won the Elsevier/Johan de Witt Thesis Prize for his master thesis, titled ‘The development of the Dutch press in the seventeenth century, 1618 – 1700’. A two volume bibliography, Dutch and Flemish Newspapers of the Seventeenth Century, based on this same thesis will be published in May.

Anne Rutten was awarded the 2016 Dorothy Dunnett Academic History Prize for her essay ‘And There Was Proof: James II, the Black Douglases and the Fifteenth-Century Power of Documents’.

Staff Activity. 

On 2nd December Dr Nina Lamal gave a talk at the IHR Low Countries Seminar in London. The talk was entitled ‘The Low Countries in the news: Italian information networks on the Dutch Revolt’.

On 5th and 6th December Dr Shanti Graheli gave two guest lectures at the University of Udine, entitled, ‘Il mondo del libro antico in un guscio di noce: introduzione all’USTC’ and ‘Dove i libri sono tutti monadi. Benvenuti a The World’s Rarest Books.’

On 9th January, Dr Tomasz Kamusella talked on ‘The Normative Isomorphism of Language, Nation and State’ in the Institut für Osteuropäische Geschichte at the Universität Wien, Vienna, Austria. On 10th January, Dr Kamusella spoke on ‘The National Silesian Movement in Postcommunist Poland: Between Democracy and Nationalism’ in the Institut für Slawistik at the Universität Wien, Vienna, Austria. He also spoke on the same topic onn 13th January for the Ústav politických vied SAV (Institute of Political Sciences) and the Ústav etnológie SAV (Institute of Ethnography) in the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia.

Dr James Palmer contributed to the Radio 3 Sunday Feature ‘Apocalypse How’ on 15th January.

Dr Nathan Alexander gave a talk, entitled ‘Debating Nonreligious Identity: A Historical Perspective’ to the Dundee branch of the Humanist Society of Scotland on 16th January.

On 16h January, Dr James Nott delivered a talk on ‘The Dance Hall and Women’s Emancipation in Britain 1918-60’ at Shoreditch House, London.
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From 18 to 20 January Professor Elena Marushiakova and Professor Veselin Popov took part in the MigRom Final Conference as invited key note speakers with an opening presentation entitled “Migration vs. Inclusion: Roma Mobility from East to West”.

On 22nd January, Dr Emily Michelson published an article in the Times Higher Education blog, entitled ‘Historians make the best healthcare workers.’

On 27 January Sarah Easterby-Smith gave a paper entitled ‘Picturing Banks’s networks: patrons, scholars and botanical merchants’ at an AHRC workshop at the National Portrait Gallery, London, on ‘Science, Self-fashioning and Representation in Joseph Banks’s Circles’.

On 28th January Dr Konrad Lawson gave the talk “From the Regional to the Global: Pan-Asianism to World Federalism in the Aftermath of Japanese Empire” at a Leiden University symposium on Global Regionalism as part of the Contemporary History and International Relations Research Seminar.

Recent Publications

David Allan, ‘“Winged Horses, Fiery Dragons and Monstrous Giants”: Historiography and Imaginative Literature in the Scottish Enlightenment’ in R. McLean, R. Young and K. Simpson (eds.), The Scottish Enlightenment and Literary Culture (Bucknell University Press, 2016).

Colin Kidd, The World of Mr Casaubon: Britain’s Wars of Mythography, 1700-1870 (Cambridge University Press, 2016).

Julia Prest and Guy Rowlands (eds.), The Third Reign of Louis XIV, c. 1682-1715 (Routledge, 2016).