April and May Round Up

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Photo attrib. to Dunnock, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0

Staff Activity

On 24th May Justine Firnhaber-Baker gave a keynote lecture, ‘Seigneurial War and Peasant Revolts, or What’s in a Name?’ at the Medieval Culture and War Conference in Brussels

New Publications

Margaret Connolly, ‘The Representation of King Conred’s Kight in The Miroir and The Mirror’.  In Catherine Batt and Rene Tixier (eds.), Booldly bot meekly: Essays on the Theory and Practice of Translation in the Middle Ages in Honour of Roger Ellis (Turnhout: Brepols, 2018): 51-68.

Rab Houston, ‘The composition and distribution of the legal profession, and the use of law in early modern Britain and Ireland’. Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis (April 2018).

 

Tomasz Kamusella‘Jak chronić śląszczyznę’ (Translated: How to protect the Silesian
language?). Tygodnik Powszechny (March 2018)

Colin Kidd, ‘Global Turns: Other States, Other Civilizations’, New England Quarterly 91,
no. 1 (March 2018): 172-199.

Colin Kidd, ‘The Scottish Enlightenment and the Matter of Troy’. Journal of the British
Academy 6 (March 2018): 97-130.

Simon MacLean. ‘”Waltharius”: Treasure, Revenge and Kingship in the Ottonian Wild West’. In Kate Gilbert and Stephen White (eds.), Emotion, Violence, Vengeance and Law in the Middle Ages (Leiden: Brill, 2018): 225-251.

Jacqueline Rose. ‘Roman Imperium and the Restoration Church’. Studies in Church History 54: The Church and Empire (June 2018): 159-75.

Guy Rowlands, ‘Keep Right on to the End of the Road: the Stamina of the French Army
in the War of the Spanish Succession’. In Matthias Pohlig and Michael Schaich (eds.), The
War of the Spanish Succession: New Perspectives (Oxford: Oxford University Press and the German Historical Institute London, 2018): 323-341.

Celebrating the 700th Anniversary of the Consecration of St Andrews Cathedral

 

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Image attrib. Smart History, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0

Seven hundred years ago, on July 5th, 1318, St Andrews Cathedral was formally consecrated. The cathedral had been under construction for 150 years and was already home to its Augustinian community, but a great storm in 1272 had blown down the west front of the building and greatly delayed its dedication. The consecration in 1318 was thus long-awaited, and also came at a significant point in Scotland’s history: only four years after Robert the Bruce’s victory at the Battle of Bannockburn, the opulent consecration of one of the largest cathedrals in the British Isles, and the largest building in Scotland (a title it retained until the construction of Edinburgh’s Waverley Railway Station in the nineteenth century), stated clearly that the Church in Scotland was not subservient to English prelates, and advertised the strong links between Scotland’s political and religious elite. The lavish ceremony was attended by King Robert I, and was one in a continuing line of momentous religious and political events that marked out St Andrews as one of medieval Scotland’s principal burghs.

 

 

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Image attrib. Smart History, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0

This summer, the celebrations commemorating this important anniversary aim to recreate some of the pageantry and significance of the original event. A range of institutions, societies, and research initiatives have combined efforts to create an exciting line-up of public lectures on the history of the cathedral, historical tours of the burgh, and viewing opportunities with extant manuscripts and objects, to take place throughout June and early July. A free exhibition at the Museum of the University of St Andrews, throughout April and June, will showcase more of the extant material related to the cathedral, and tell the story of the consecration. On Saturday, 30 June, a theatrical pageant will bring to life the cathedral’s long history and its central role in the development of the burgh of St Andrews and of Scotland as a whole. In addition, digital reconstructions of the cathedral and its environs, created by Smart History and made available by Historic Environment Scotland, will be presented as an opportunity to view the cathedral as it might have looked in its glory days: a soaring, atmospheric, busy, and vital centre of religious life, pilgrimage, and lay devotion.

The event schedule includes:

 

The Story of St Andrews Cathedral – 700th Anniversary Historical Pageant

Saturday 30 June at 14:00 in St Andrews Cathedral.

University of St Andrews Service of Thanksgiving – Including Commemoration of the 700th Anniversary of St Andrews Cathedral

Sunday 1 July at 11:00 in St Salvator’s Chapel.

An Exceptional and Prestigious Church – A Walk Celebrating 700 Years of St Andrews Cathedral in Collaboration with Fife Pilgrim Way

Sunday 1 July at 14:00, starts outside St Andrews Museum, Kinburn Park.

Show and Tell of Manuscripts Associated with St Andrews Cathedral – Public Event by the University of St Andrews Library’s Special Collections Division

Wednesday 4 July at 14:00 in the Special Collections Napier Reading Room, Martyr’s Kirk.

Pilgrimage in Honour of Our Lady and St Andrew, Commemorating the 700th Anniversary of the Consecration of St Andrews Cathedral – Organised by New Dawn Conference

Thursday 5 July, begins at 9.30 at St James’s Church, Open Air Mass at 11.30 at St Andrews Cathedral.

Service to Commemorate the 700th Anniversary of St Andrews Cathedral – Organised by All Saints Church

Thursday 5 July at 15:00 in St Andrews Cathedral.

Act of Remembrance and Sung Eucharist – Organised by All Saints Church

Sunday 8 July, remembrance begins at 9.40 in St Andrews Cathedral, and is followed by a sung service at 10 in All Saints Church.

For more information and an updated list of events, see: https://www.openvirtualworlds.org/st-andrews-cathedral-1318-to-2018/

Contact: cathedral700@gmail.com

Thanks go to all the contributing groups including: University of St Andrews, Smart History, Historic Environment Scotland, Kate Kennedy Trust, Fife Pilgrim Way, New Dawn Conference, All Saints Church, BID St Andrews, and Tourism St Andrews.

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Image attrib. Smart History, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0

 

Face to Face: Stories from the Asylum

 

Blog written by PhD student Morag Allan Campbell

 

Morag and exhibition

Morag Allan Campbell, photo reproduced by permission of DC Thomson & Co

The Face to Face: Stories from the Asylum exhibition, currently on display in the Tower Foyer Gallery, University of Dundee, explores the lives of a group of patients admitted to Dundee Royal Lunatic Asylum at the turn of the twentieth century.  It has been researched and curated by St Andrews student Morag Allan Campbell, who is in the third year of her PhD in Modern History.  In this blog post, Morag outlines the origins of Face to Face, and her experience of preparing an exhibition for public display.

My research is pretty much based on lunatic asylum records, and I’ve spent a long time reading case notes from the early to mid-nineteenth century, patient histories laid out in page after page of scratchy, florid handwriting.  Reading through those files, I can only guess at what those patients might have looked like, piecing together an idea from physicians’ explanations of their mental disorder. When I turned to notes from later in the century, I began to find small faded photographs stuck into many of the patients’ notes, and I felt as if I had suddenly come face to face with my subjects. I wanted to know more about the lives behind those faces, and to share some of their stories.  And an exhibition seemed to be the best way to do that.

Curating the Face to Face exhibition has had the added benefit of allowing me to research the stories of patients not directly connected with my own research topic, which focusses on women suffering from postnatal mental illness, and has thoroughly immersed me in the experience of putting material together for public display.  I started with the patient histories, selecting and researching a number of cases to gather a range of diagnoses and backgrounds.  I then edited their stories into short texts, and paired them with information on various diagnoses supplied by my supervisor, Prof Rab Houston, who is an expert on the history of psychiatry – many of the diagnoses would be unfamiliar to modern ears, or they had a different meaning from how we use them today.

The next step was to design and layout all the boards – I tried to create a good balance of text and visual material, to attract and engage the reader without overloading them with too much information.  The archivists at Dundee University supplied me with some images to add local context to the patients’ stories, though I did use images from other sources.  In one case, an image from one external source was going to be too costly, and so I ended up grabbing my camera and heading off to take a picture myself – which I used, slightly sepia tinted to match the tone of the other images.

It was nerve-wracking when the time came to send the designs off to the printers, as I was dreading that mistakes might jump out at me when I unwrapped the finished product.  I am indebted to Caroline Brown, Dundee University Archivist, and Matthew Jarron, Curator of Museum Services at the University of Dundee, for their help and advice while I was putting together the exhibition, and not least for their invaluable assistance in proofreading the boards!  Caroline, Jan, Sharon and the rest of the team at the archives offered me plenty of support, and also selected some actual archive material and records for display as part of the exhibition.

Dundee Press Coverage 2.JPGWhen the time came for Matthew and me to put up the boards in the Tower Foyer Gallery, people were already showing an interest and we had a small crowd reading the boards before they had even been fully fixed to the wall.  It has been really amazing to see the interest in the exhibition. Since the launch, I have been working in the archives regularly which, as the department is located in the basement of the Tower Building, has taken me past the exhibition almost every day.  There has scarcely been a time when I have gone past and not found someone intently reading the exhibition boards, and I have also been able to chat with many of the visitors. What has really struck me is how actively people have engaged with the material – each viewer brings their own history and their own views to the experience, and I feel that the exhibition at Dundee has been really successful in opening up a dialogue on the subject of mental health issues past and present.

Putting the exhibition together was not without its difficulties, and it has been many months in the making. We also had ethical and data protection issues to consider before I could even start doing any research. The excitement of actually seeing the boards in place, not to mention the positive feedback which very quickly started to roll in, has more than made up for all the hours spent working away in the archives researching patient histories, and all those further hours spent carefully editing copy and making minute but crucial adjustments to display boards.

Edith.jpgThe exhibition is part of a St Andrews project, ‘Promoting Mental Health through the Lessons of History’ led by Rab Houston, and is a collaboration with University of Dundee Archive Services.   When the exhibition is finished at Dundee, Rab will take over the reins and has plans to tour the exhibition.  He has already arranged for a smaller version to be displayed in two Scottish prisons in association with Fife College and the Scottish Prison Service Learning and Skills initiative.  The university has been working in partnership with Fife College as part of the ground-breaking public engagement programme Cell Block Science.

If you would like to host the exhibition, or know of someone else who would, Rab would be happy to hear from you!  Further information is available on the project website. The main exhibition is on display at the University of Dundee until June 9, and is open Monday – Friday 09:30 – 19:00 and on Saturdays from 13:00 – 17:00.

 

 

 

 

 

March Round Up

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Photo attrib. Sarah, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0

News

Congratulations to Dr John Condren, who has received a Rome Award from the British School at Rome, to conduct research for an article on diplomatic ceremonial at the papal court in the late 17th century

Congratulations to Professor Aileen Fyfe, Professor Knud Haakonssen, Professor Colin Kidd and Professor Richard Whatmore. They have received a Leverhulme Trust Large Grant for their project After Enlightenment: Intellectual Life in Scotland, 1790-1843

Staff Activity

On March 19, the Editing Early Modern Texts and Sources: Problems and Possibilities conference took place

Professor Guy Rowlands presented the papers ‘The Last Argument of the King? Arms, Artillery and Absolutism under Louis XIV’to the Medieval and Renaissance Group, and ‘The Sinews of War, the Sun King, and the Financial Burdens and Perils of Being a Superpower’ at the history department of the College of William and Mary

On March 27th, Dr Gillian Mitchell delivered a paper entitled ‘Popular Music and Family Life, 1955-1975: Questioning Notions of Generation Gap’ at the ‘Recording Leisure Lives’ conference at the University of Bolton

On March 27th, Professor Richard Whatmore gave a talk entitled ‘Rights after the Revolutions’ for the Johns Hopkins Political and Moral Thought Seminar series

Publications

Aileen Fyfe and Camilla Mørk Røstvik, ‘How female fellows fared at the Royal Society,’ Nature (6 March 2018)

Tomasz Kamusella and Fenix Ndhlovu, ‘Kamusella and Ndhlovu on Linguistic Imperialism,’ Social Science Matters (March 2018)

Mara van der Lugt, ‘The left hand of the Englightenment: truth, error, and integrity in Bayle and Kant,’ History of European Ideas (26 Feb 2018)

Richard Whatmore, Béla Kapossy, Isaac Nakhimovsky and Sophus Reinert (eds.),  Markets, Morals and Politics. Jealousy of Trade and the History of Political Thought (Harvard University Press, 2018)

February Round Up

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Photo attrib. Peryn Westerhof Nyman, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0

News

Congratulations to Dr Kate Ferris for receiving a European Research Council
grant for her project on dictatorship and everyday life in Mediterranean Europe
(1922-1975)

Staff Activity

In early February, Dr Akhila Yechury gave a paper titled ‘Rethinking Imperial
Margins: French Borderlands in India, c.1815-1947’ at the international conference ‘Between Empires: The Making and Unmaking of Borers, 19th-20th Centuries‘ held at Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi

On 5 February, Dr Konrad M. Lawson gave a talk on the 1937 German-Japanese co-produced film The New Earth at the Institute for Global Cinema and Creative Cultures workshop Setsuko Hara @ St Andrews

On 7 February, Dr Gillian Mitchell participated in the Music Public Talks series at the Byre Theatre. She presented a paper entitled ‘British Pop Stars and Pantomime from the 1950s to the 1970s

Dr Yechury also participated in a British Academy sponsored international public engagement event at the University of York on 9-10 February called ‘Revising the Geography of Modern World History: New Research in Modern Trans-Regional History

On February 15, Dr Neil McGuigan presented his paper ‘Máel Coluim III and the Norman Conquest’ at the ISHR seminar

Professor Steve Murdoch gave the paper ‘Britain and the Thirty Years’ War: The
Evolution of a Field of Study’ at the Modern History seminar.

New Publications

Jordan Girardin, ‘How the first Winter Games harnessed the publicity power of
the OlympicsThe Conversation (15 Feb 2018)

Carole Hillenbrand and Robert Hillenbrand, ‘Ancient Iranian Kings in the World
History of Rashid Al-Din’, Iran: Journal of British Institute of Persian Studies (Feb
2018)

James Palmer, ‘The adoption of the Dionysian Easter in the Frankish kingdoms
(c. 670-800)’ Peritia: Journal of the Medieval Academy of Ireland, 28 (2017): 135-54.

Tomasz Kamusella, ‘Russian: Between Re-Ethnicisation and Pluricentrism’, New
Eastern Europe (Feb 2018)

Guy Rowlands, ‘Keep Right on to the End of the Road: the Stamina of the French
Army in the War of Spanish Succession’ in Michael Schaich and Matthias Pohlig
(eds), The War of the Spanish Succession. New Perspectives (Oxford University
Press, 2018)

December and January Round Up

News

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Photo attrib. Richard Sanderson, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0

Congratulations to Dr James Palmer, who was won a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship for his project ‘Science and Belief in the Making of Early Medieval Europe‘, commencing in 2018

Dr Katie Stevenson has been appointed to the post of Assistant Vice-Principal Collections

Staff Activity

On 4 January Dr Mara van der Lugt gave the Haydn Mason Lecture at the annual conference of the British Society of Eighteenth-Century Studies; entitled ‘Error or Integrity: Questions of Conscience in the Long Eighteenth Century

Dr Margaret Connolly and Rachel Hart presented the paper ‘A late medieval book and its covers: the Marchmont MS of Regiam Maiestatem and its scribe(s)’ at the Scottish Medievalists conference

On January 23, Dr Sarah Easterby-Smith gave the paper ‘Seeds of Knowledge: A Microhistory of Colonial Science at the End of the French Old Regime’ at Queen Mary’s Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies

Dr Tomasz Kamusella spoke on ‘The Forgotten 1989 Expulsion of Turks from Communist Bulgaria’ at the CRSCEES Seminar Series

On January  27, Dr Chandrika Kaul, presented ‘Scotland’s Imperial Past and Present’ at Rethinking Race in Scotland

Professor Steve Murdoch gave the paper ‘Sir James Spens: British Ambassador, Swedish General & European Spymaster’ to the Crail History Society, and spoke on ‘Scotland and the Thirty Years’ War’ to the Scone and District Historical Society

Publications

John Clark, ‘The Coproduction of Modern Science and the Modern State: To Bee or Not to Bee’ State Formations: Global Histories and Cultures of Statehood ed. by J. Brooke, J. Strauss, J. & G. Anderson, pp. 215-228.

Sarah Easterby-Smith, ‘John Hill, Exotic Botany and the Competitive World of Eighteenth-Century Horticulture‘, in Fame and Fortune: Sir John Hill and the London Life in the 1750s, ed. by Clare Brant, George Rousseau, pp. 291-313.

Carole Hillenbrand, ‘The Holy Land in the Crusader and Ayyubid periods, 1099-1250’, in The Oxford Illustrated History of the Holy Land, ed. by Robert Hoyland , Hugh Williamson.

Tomasz Kamusella, ‘The Arabic Language: A Latin of Modernity?‘, Journal of Nationalism, Memory and Language Politics, (vol. 11, no. 2), 117-145.

Colin Kidd, Gerard Carruthers (eds.), Literature and Union: Scottish Texts, British Contexts.

Elena Marushiakova and Vesselin Popov, ‘Commencement of Roma Civic Emancipation‘, Studies in Arts and Humanities, (vol. 3, no. 2), 32-55.

5th Annual Late Medieval France and Burgundy Seminar

Blog written by Dr Justine Firnhaber-Baker

AudiencephotoThe fifth meeting of the Late Medieval France and Burgundy (LMFB) seminar took place at St Andrews on 1st and 2nd December. The LMFB, an annual, multidisciplinary conference, was originally set up by the literary scholar Ros Brown-Grant (Leeds) and the historians Graeme Small (Durham) and Craig Taylor (York). Different universities host the conference each year and the format often varies, but one constant is that it is a friendly and welcoming venue. A particular purpose of the seminar is to keep scholars in touch with one another’s work and to introduce early career scholars and aspiring students to more established figures in the field.

The seminar attracted many attendants, both from St Andrews and other universities, including Kent, Durham, Liverpool, and Leeds. The presentations kicked off with papers from St Andrew’s own Vicky Turner (French) and Agnès Bos (Art History), who spoke on Saracen princesses and Renaissance Gothic furniture, respectively. Trevor Smith (Leeds) then spoke about a subject of more local interest: the reputation of King David II ‘the defecator’ in French and English literature, while Rémy Ambühl (Southhampton), who did his PhD at St Andrews, revised our understanding of what it meant to be a prisoner of war, with particular attention to Jeanne d’Arc. After lunch, Ralph Moffat (Arms and Armour Department of the Glasgow Museums) explained how plate armour and poll-axes worked to a very attentive audience. The first day finished with Lindy Grant’s exploration of Capetian funerary sites and Charlotte Crouch’s discussion of the reluctance of the comital family of Nevers to carry their bishop to his installation.

SpeakerphotoThe second day of the seminar opened with a roundtable on accessing archives and bibliographies in France. It was led by Agnès Bos (St Andrews), Erika Graham-Goering (Ghent) and Kirstin Bourassa (Southern Denmark and York), but quickly became a lively and extremely helpful group discussion, sharing experiences and resources. Emily Guerry (Kent) then treated us to a reassessment of the iconography of the Crown of Thorns and its translation to the Sainte-Chapelle, followed by Emma Campbell (Warwick) on the theme of cutting in both thirteenth-century literary fiction and material manuscript reality. At lunchtime, the participants went down into the St Andrews Castle mine and countermine, a thrilling if claustrophobic (and cold!) experience. The conference finished with papers by Pierre Courroux (Poitiers and Southhampton) on a chronicle written by a mercenary about a military captain, and Michael Depreter (Saint-Louis — Bruxelles and Oxford) on the participants and interests involved in Anglo-Burgundian treaties of the late fifteenth century.

This year’s seminar was made possible by funding from the School of History, the St Andrews Institute for Mediaeval Studies, and the Centre for French History and Culture. It was organized by Justine Firnhaber-Baker, with the help of Vicky Turner (French), as well Dorothy Christie and Audrey Wishhart (Mediaeval History administrators) and Ysaline Bourgine de Meder and Gert-Jan Van de Voorde (St Andrews and Ghent). Next year, the conference will be held at Liverpool, with Godfried Croenen’s organization. If you would like to be added to the email list or the Facebook group for the seminar, please email jmfb@st-andrews.ac.uk.