Postdoc Spotlight: Sarah Greer

 

Sarah Greer joined the School of History at St Andrews in September 2013 as a Marie Skłowdowska-Curie Research Fellow while she completed her PhD on ninth- and tenth-century Saxon female monasteries under the supervision of Professor Simon MacLean. This was not what she expected when she started her tertiary education. After graduating from a high-school history curriculum which focused almost exclusively on twentieth-century history, Sarah was determined to take as wide a range of modules as possible when she arrived at the University of Auckland. Three years followed of courses ranging from Ancient Egyptian religion to modern Australian history, but when she enrolled in a paper on the Later Roman Empire and the ‘barbarian’ kingdoms of Western Europe in her final semester she was hooked. Her Honours dissertation was on the origins of female monasticism in sixth-century Gaul; this was followed by a research masters on the function of double monasteries under the Merovingians and Carolingians in the sixth to eighth centuries and she was lured even closer to the High Middle Ages during her doctoral research. She is now peeking over at the Salian and Capetian dynasties with interest, but still likes to describe herself as an early medieval historian.

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Hrotsvitha presenting her Gesta Ottonis to Otto I, photo attrib. Sarah Greer

Sarah was fortunate enough to be able to come to St Andrews on a fellowship through a research network called Power and Institutions in Medieval Islam and Christendom (PIMIC), which also included Professor John Hudson, Professor Caroline Humfress and Cory Hitt. As PIMIC was an EU-funded Innovative Training Network, this meant that in addition to working on her thesis, Sarah has spent the past three years also taking part in a variety of training workshops across Europe. She was also seconded to work at Brill Publishers in Leiden for three months in 2014; at the Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne for three months in 2015; and at the Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales in Madrid for two months in 2016. She also took part in a month-long documentary film school as part of PIMIC, and remains grateful to the PhD students from the Mediaeval department who stood in as various members of the Ottonian imperial family for her documentary on Mathilda of Quedlinburg.

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The city of Quedlinburg, photo attrib. Sarah Greer

Having submitted her doctoral thesis in September 2016, Sarah is delighted to be continuing her connection with both the School of History at St Andrews and the EU. She has been selected as the postdoctoral research fellow under the supervision of Professor MacLean as part of the new HERA-funded research network: ‘After Empire: Using and Not Using the Past in the Tenth Century’, which joins together historians from St Andrews, Exeter, Berlin, Vienna and Barcelona. Sarah will work on how tenth-century people interacted with earlier royal mausolea and used the memories of the past embedded in these sites in the post-Carolingian world. She is very happy to remain in Scotland for another three years on this fellowship, although she does at times miss New Zealand’s summers.

 

Monthly Round Up: July and August

sprawyNews

Professor John Hudson of the School of History and Professor Lorna Hutson of the School of English have been elected Fellows of the British Academy

Staff Activity

Professor Rab Houston has launched the podcast series The History of Psychiatry in Britain since the Renaissance.

Dr James Palmer has written ‘Crossing the Continent’ for History Today, about pro-European historiography and political exiles after the Second World War

Members of the Universal Short Title Catalogue attended the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing annual conference, this year held at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France. They presented their current research connected with a new initiative entitled ‘Preserving the World’s Rarest Books’. Supported by the Andrew Mellon Foundation, this new programme seeks to help libraries identify and conserve their rarest items. Professor Andrew Pettegree discussed ‘Survival and Loss in the Early Modern Book World’, Dr Graeme Kemp spoke on ‘Jacques Charles Brunet’s Manuel du libraire et de l’amateur des livres and the World’s Rarest Books’, while Dr Shanti Graheli discussed ‘Italian Books in French Libraries: Bibliophilie, Rarity and Survival’.

Recent Publications

Dr Tomasz Kamusella, ‘Nations in the Bubble of Social Reality: Language and all That’, Sprawy Narodowościowe, (2016), 48, pp. 1-21.

Several of Dr Tomasz Kamusella’s former undergraduate students also published articles in the same journal:

Maria Isabella Reinhard, ‘“An isolated case”: the Slovene Carinthians and the 1920 Plebiscite’

Hana Srebotnjak, ‘Tracing the decline of Yugoslav identity: a case for ‘invisible’ ethnic cleansing’

Michael Julian Emanuel Volkmer, ‘No Austrians in South Tyrol? Why the German-speaking community in Italy’s South Tyrol (Alto Adige) province is not usually called an Austrian minority’

Living with the Law: Society and Legal Disputes c. 1200-1700 Conference Report

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Photo attrib. Teddie Bridget Proctor, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0

Blog post written by PhD student Sarah White

The Institute of Legal and Constitutional Research at the University of St Andrews hosted a conference over June 27-29, entitled “Living with the Law: Society and Legal Disputes, c. 1200-1700.” The goal of this conference was to provide a number of perspectives on how the practice of both secular and church courts was aided or hindered by the involvement of wider society. The second, perhaps overlapping question, is the effect of social relationships on the actual conduct of the parties to a dispute, both inside and outside the courtroom. The conference took an interdisciplinary approach to these questions by inviting papers on from the perspectives of law, legal history, constitutionalism, literature, and social history over a relatively broad period of time, in order to facilitate wide-ranging discussion.

The conference was organised by two PhD students at St Andrews, (now Dr) Will Eves and Sarah White, and papers were given by research students, early career researchers, and established and senior scholars. Papers covered the medieval and early modern periods, and concerned both the common law and ius commune. The two plenary lectures were given by Professor Paul Brand (“The Law and Social Mobility in Thirteenth-Century England: The Case of the Weyland Family”) and Professor Sir John Baker (“1616: ‘A Year Consecrate to Justice’”). Panels covered “The Manipulation of Legal Process in High Medieval Europe” (Felicity Hill, Kenneth Duggan, and Cory Hitt, chaired by William Ian Miller), “Legal Interpretation and Theory” (Danica Summerlin, Joanna McCunn, and Lorenzo Moniscalco, chaired by Emanuele Conte), “Edinburgh Law School Session” (Hector MacQueen and John W. Cairns, chaired by Colin Kidd), “Law and Legal Practice in Early Modern Europe” (Kelsey Jackson-Williams, Julia Kelso, and Saskia Limbach, chaired by Magnus Ryan), “Lordship, Loyalty and the Law” (Matt McHaffie and Josh Hey, chaired by George Garnett). On the final day of the conference, John Hudson, William Ian Miller, and Magnus Ryan led a roundtable discussion, with a closing summary by Caroline Humfress.

The conference was designed to bring together postgraduate students, early-career researchers and established academics who are working in the field of legal history. The goal was to allow delegates to discuss their work with other historians and legal scholars, and to make connections and draw inspiration from the broad range of research that is presented. The second goal, following from the first, was to promote a sustainable network of support and communication between scholars and research institutions at a number of universities across the UK.

The mix of junior and senior researchers led to interesting discussions and established new connections between the various universities represented by the attendees. Both the panels and the breaks created a good environment for communication and connections between scholars and attendees from outside St Andrews expressed interest in continuing the conference in two years’ time.

The conference also included a chance to see the Marchmont MS of Regiam Majestatem recently acquired by St Andrews, as well a number of interesting legal-themed items from Special Collections in a thoughtful and well-curated display organised by Rachel Hart and Maia Sheridan.

Publication Spotlight: ‘Diverging Paths?: Power and Institutions in Medieval Islam and Christendom’

“Why did certain sorts of institutionalisation and institutional continuity characterise government and society in Christendom by the later Middle Ages, but not the Islamic world, whereas the reverse end-point might have been predicted from the early medieval situation?”
This question lies at the core of Prof. John Hudson’s new publication, co-edited with Ana Rodriguez, Diverging Paths?: Power and Institutions in Medieval Islam and Christendom. In the eighth century, government in the Islamic world featured bureaucracy in a way unimaginable in Christendom, and especially western Christendom, in the same period. By the end of the middle ages, however, the latter region was dominated by a number of highly sophisticated institutions. Diverging Paths takes a number of these institutions in the Byzantine, western and Islamic worlds, and explores their formation, in the hope of answering or revising this question.

This book is the product of a collaborative project on comparative institutionalisation across western Christendom, eastern Christendom and the Islamic world in the period c.750–1350. The collaborations began in the late 1990s, between mediaevalists at St Andrews and at the CSIC in Madrid.  Work began by exploring the legitimisation of political authority. Gradually, over time, the group expanded and started to look at broader issues of power and institutions.  In 2008, the group received a grant from the Spanish government which enabled them to focus on the processes of institutionalisation. The project was based primarily on a series of workshops. These led to a conference, which in turn resulted in Diverging Paths.

The use of a tripartite comparison between Byzantium, western Christendom and the Islamic world is central to this study. It was driven, and indeed made possible, by the strengths of the history department at St Andrews in these three areas. John believes this approach has a number of benefits. Examination of similar themes in a number of societies helps scholars to reconsider their assumptions. Furthermore, the study of a process, such as ‘institutionalisation’, is made more meaningful when it is conducted in a number of contexts and cultures.

It was this comparative approach, however, which led to most of the intellectual challenges the project faced. How broad should the comparisons be? The ‘Islamic World’ or ‘Western Christendom’ are, of course, very large categories and a lot of variety can be noticed within them: as in the present day, Iceland and Sicily were very different places in this period, but both come under the umbrella of ‘Western Christendom’. However, these comparisons needed to be broad enough to allow the group to pose the questions they did, and facilitate meaningful investigation.

More specifically for this study, both institutions and institutional processes need to be defined.  Two potential challenges presented themselves here: to get something which was not too vague, whilst at the same time not creating a definition that was too culturally specific. In response to this, the group created a working list of ten criteria, including ‘institutional memory’, ‘identification with institutions’, ‘normative nature’ and ‘self-replication’. Thus, the networks of Benedictine monasticism which came to dominate western Christendom in this period were definable as institutions. The smaller religious communities of sixth-century Francia, on the other hand, which often died out within a few decades of foundation, were less institutionalised.

PIMIC opening workshop, St Andrews

PIMIC opening workshop, St Andrews, 2013

The publication of Diverging Paths is not the end of the process, but in many ways it is the beginning. John is currently involved in a number of projects that have grown out of this one, and which also make use cross-cultural comparisons in their examination of institutionalisation. The largest of these is the EU funded project ‘Powers and Institutions in Medieval Islam and Christendom’, or PIMIC. Whilst PIMIC does still have an academic thrust, it is primarily a training network which was created to fund PhDs and postdocs. Currently two of these PhD students are working at St Andrews, Cory Hitt and Sarah Greer, and you can read more about some of PIMIC’s activities here and here.
In addition to this, John is currently planning another research project which will consider the development of law in Europe between 1050 and 1250. This project will argue that whilst the divergence between the continental civil law and English common law traditions did originate in that period, there were more similarities between English and Continental law than the traditional narrative of difference would lead us to believe. John will also continue to make use of the broader tripartite comparison between Western Christendom, Eastern Christendom and the Islamic worlds in this project: there are plans for a workshop which will bring together legal scholars working on each of these regions.

Diverging Paths does not answer to the question it poses in its introduction; indeed, unusually, there is no concluding chapter. John is keen to point out that this is deliberate. This study is a starting point: it ought to provoke further debate, rather than presenting a solution, or a final word on this topic.

Apply Now: School of History Emeritus Fellowship

The School of History at the University of St Andrews is initiating an annual ‘Emeritus Fellowship’ for retired academic staff formerly employed by any University or equivalent institution, with the first Fellowship being held in Academic Year 2014-15. The Fellow will be expected to spend 3-6 months of the academic year in St Andrews and to participate in the research activities of the School, including giving a paper to the appropriate Research Seminar and having contact with postgraduate students in the appointee’s field.

The Fellowship will be worth £3000 for use towards accommodation, travel, and research.  The Fellow will also receive full Library and IT access and secretarial support. It is hoped but cannot be guaranteed that the Fellow will receive office accommodation.

Applications should consist of a CV (maximum 4 pages), a statement of research to be undertaken during the Fellowship (maximum 1 page), and the name of two referees who may be contacted. These should be emailed to the Head of History (currently Professor John Hudson) at hhis@st-andrews.ac.uk by 15 June 2014.

St Andrews to sponsor Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship Applicants

QuadThe School of History and the University of St Andrews is pleased to announce that it will sponsor outstanding researchers who are eligible and wish to apply for a Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship. This scheme enables early career researchers to undertake a significant piece of publishable work. Applicants must have a track record of research, but should not have held an established academic appointment. To be considered for University sponsorship, and if you wish to have an ECF in the School of History, please discuss your application in the first instance with the Head of the School of History, Prof. John Hudson.

The application to the University should be sent to provost@st-andrews.ac.uk and should be in the form of a draft of a Leverhulme application. The deadline for applications to the University is 10 January 2014.

Vacancy: Professor in Mediaeval History

The School of History is seeking to appoint a Professor of Mediaeval History specialising in any historical field, geographical region, and chronological period within the Middle Ages.

Applicants should show evidence of outstanding productivity and quality in their own research. They must also have displayed a high quality of teaching at university level, including an ability to bring imagination to tutorials, seminars and lectures. They will be expected to contribute fully to the research, teaching, and administration of the School. Further information on the University and the School of History can be found at the University website. To discuss this post informally candidates might also wish to contact the Head of School, Professor John Hudson.

Closing Date:  19 December 2013

Further particulars and how to apply can be found here.

PIMIC opening workshop in St Andrews

pimic parliament hall

In the last days of October St Andrews hosted the opening workshop of the European funded project Power and Institutions in Medieval Islam and Christendom. Scholars and postgraduate students from Europe, Israel, and North America met for a training course on Sources in Context, held in the University’s Parliament Hall. The 3.3 million Euro project combines academic research with training in wider dissemination, based on collaboration between universities and private sector companies. It provides funding for 10 PhD researchers at universities in Spain, Britain, Italy, France, and Israel, and two postdoctoral positions, one based at a Dutch publisher and one at a Spanish television and film production company. At the present workshop, sessions were held on Record Sources (led by Tim Greenwood and John Hudson); Narrative Sources (Rob Bartlett and Eduardo Manzano); Archaeology (Hugh Kennedy and Alessandra Molinari); Lawbooks (Magnus Ryan and Bernard Stolte); and Literary Sources (Gadi Algazi and Steve White). The project’s postgraduate students (from New Zealand, Argentina, Russia, Finland, the US, UK, Germany, and Italy) also presented outlines of their PhDs and introduced a discussion of notions of institutionalisation. Collaborative working methods were developed amongst the participants in the project.

A further workshop on radio, podcasting, web-presence, and writing in the press will take place in St Andrews in June 2014, in which St Andrews History staff will participate. The project concludes with a conference on ‘Consequences in the Contemporary World’, planned to be held at the British Academy in June 2016.

PIMICSworkshop

The Research Lead of the PIMIC project is Prof. John Hudson.

Job Vacancy: Lectureship in Iranian History – ML7742

ImageThe School of History is seeking to appoint a Temporary Lecturer in Iranian History to cover research leave during this period (1 September 2013 to 31 December 2016). The successful candidate will be required to contribute to the teaching of the sub-honours module MH2002 (Introduction to Middle Eastern History) and to teach honours courses, including ME3613 (The Formation of Islamic Iran, c. 600-1200) and MO3080 (Nomadic Heritage and Persianate Culture: The Iranian world from the Timurids to the Safavids), in addition to contributing to the teaching of the MLitts in Iranian and Middle Eastern History.

Candidates will normally have a completed PhD specialising in the history of pre-modern Iran in the Islamic period (before c. 1700) and will be able to conduct independent research using Persian language primary sources.
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Further information on the University and the School of History can be found at the University website (www.st-andrews.ac.uk).

To discuss this post informally candidates might also wish to contact the Chair of Middle Eastern Studies, Professor Ali Ansari (aa51@st-andrews.ac.uk) or the Head of School, Professor John Hudson (jghh@st-andrews.ac.uk).

Ref No: ML7742

Closing Date: 1 March 2013

Further Particulars ML7742AC FPs.doc

School of History
£37,382 – £45,941 per annum
Start: 1 September 2013 or as soon as possible thereafter
Fixed Term: Until 31 December 2016

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Spring and Summer 2019 Round Up

News

Congratulations to Dr Arthur der Weduwen for being awarded the sixth Menno Hertzberger Aanmoedigingsprijs for his first book, Dutch and Flemish Newspapers of the Seventeenth Century (Brill, 2017). The prize, presented in The Hague at the Royal Library by the Menno Hertzbergerstichting and the Dutch Association of Antiquarians, is awarded every three or four years to a young scholar who has made a significant contribution to Dutch book history.

Congratulations to Professor Carole Hillenbrand who was awarded the Medal of the Royal Asiatic Society jointly with her husband Professor Robert Hillenbrand.  The honour is the most prestigious of the Society’s Awards and is presented periodically in recognition of outstanding contributions to scholarship in the field of Asian Studies.

Congratulations are in also in order for Dr Konrad Lawson for receiving one of four peer-nominated and peer-judged St Andrews Teaching Excellence awards for 2019. Also, congratulations to Dr Max Skjönsberg for being nominated for this year’s awards.

Congratulations also to Professor Elena Marushiakova for receiving an Honorary Membership from ReM ReM Club (Berlin, Germany) in recognition of her contribution to ‘Re:work’ and dedication to global labour history.

Last, but certainly not least, congratulations are in order for our newest Professor of History, James T. Palmer. Professor Palmer has been teaching at the University of St Andrews since 2007 and has made fantastic contributions to our knowledge of the early Middle Ages.

Staff Activity

On 20 March Dr Tomasz Kamusella delivered a talk titled ‘Communist Bulgaria’s Forgotten Ethnic Cleansing of Turks (1989): Thirty Years Later’ at South East European University in Tetovo, North Macedonia

In March Dr Sarah Frank went on an Erasmus Mobility + exchange to the Universite de Toulouse where she taught two undergraduate classes on French colonialism and ran a seminar for masters students.

On 4 April Professor James Palmer gave the 2019 Trinity-Worth Lecture in Dublin entitled  ‘Charlemagne’s sciences and the framing of Carolingian religion’.

On 10 April Dr Chandrika Kaul delivered two lectures titled ‘The Mahatma and the Media’ and ‘Imperial Media Events: The British Empire and India in the early twentieth century’ at the University of Lund, Sweden.

On 11-12 April Dr Thomasz Kamusella gave two papers, titled ‘The Un-Polish Poland, 1989 and the Illusion of Regained Historical Continuity’ and ‘The Material and Social Reality: Ontological and Epistemic Objectivity’ at the Department of History of the University of Tallinn. On 17-18 April he delivered ‘Creating Languages: Politics and Nationalism in Modern Central Europe’ and ‘The Forgotten 1989 Expulsion of Turks from Communist Bulgaria’ at the Department of History of the University of Tartu in Estonia.

On 15-16 April Dr Rory Cox took part in the ‘NATO and Cultural Property Protection: Embracing New Challenges in the Era of Identity Wars’ conference in Brussels, organised by the Secretary General, Human Security Unit.

From 2-4 May the team of ERC advanced grant project RomaInterbellum took part in the Association for the Study of Nationalities World Convention in the special panel ‘Roma Civic Emacipation between the Two World Wars’. Professor Elena Marushiakova and Professor Veselin Popov presented on ‘Letter to Stalin: Roma Visions on Gypsy Policy in the Early USSR’; Dr Raluca Bianca Roman talked on ‘”The voice of the Roma”? National Identity, Ethnic Building and Regional Politics within Roma-led Publications in Interwar Romania’; and Dr Sofiya Zahova gave a talk entitled ‘Romani Self-representation in the “Gypsy Newspaper” of Interwar Yugoslavia’.

On 6 May Dr Justine Firnhaber-Baker gave a paper titled ‘States, Cities, and Seigneurs: Negotiating Power in the Western Mediterranean around 1250’ to the Medieval History Seminar at Martin-Luther-Universität in Halle, Germany.

On 9 May Dr Konrad Lawson gave the talk ‘Comparison and Connection in the Shadow of the Japanese Empire’ at the conference ‘Modern Japan in the Comparative Imagination’ at Durham University.

On 13 May Dr Tomasz Kamusella delivered the invited talk on ‘Language and Nationalism in the Southern Baltic Region’ for the workshop ‘New Nationalisms in the Baltic Sea Regions‘, at the University of Greifswald. On 15 May he spoke on ‘Russian: A World or National Language, and Geopolitics‘ at the Institut für Slavistik, University of Hamburg.

On 25 May Dr Chandrika Kaul was invited to present a paper on ‘Orwell, India and the BBC’ at the Rebel? Prophet? Relic? Perspectives on George Orwell conference at University College, London. On 27 May she delivered a guest lecture on ‘The Mahatma and the Media’, at the Karl Jaspers Centre for Transcultural Studies, University of Heidelberg. Dr Kaul also delivered a lecture on ‘Media and the British and Portuguese empires, themes in comparative perspective’, at the University of Birmingham on 29 May.

On 25 May Dr Rory Cox was interviewed for an episode of The Good Community podcast entitled ‘The Military, War, and the Common Good‘.

Throughout August Professor Rab Houston ran an exhibition at the National Records of Scotland entitled ‘Prisoners or Patients? – Criminal Insanity in Victorian Scotland‘.

New Publications

Brown, Michael. ‘War, Marriage, Tournament: Scottish Politics and the Anglo-French War, 1448-1450’. Scottish Historical Review 98, no. 1 (April 2019): 1-21.

Connolly, Margaret. ‘Late Medieval Books of Hours and their Early Tudor Readers in and around London’, in Manuscript and Print in Late Medieval and Tudor Britain: Essays in Honour of Professor Julia Boffey, edited by Tamara Atkin and Jaclyn Rajsic (Woodbridge: D. S. Brewer, 2019): 107-21.

Cox, Rory. ‘Killing for culture: Responding to cultural heritage destruction as a security threat.’ Heritage in War (blog).  March 20, 2019. Accessed March 31, 2019.

Firnhaber-Baker, Justine.A Girl has a Name, and it’s not Mary Sue: Arya Stark was the Right Woman for the Job’, Newsweek (blog). 30 April 2019. Accessed 9 May 2019.

Haakonssen, Knud. ‘Millar and his circle. A preface’. History of European Ideas (April 2019): 1-3.

Hillenbrand, Carole. ‘The Assassins in fact and fiction: the Old Man of the Mountain‘, Medieval Warfare IX, no. 2 (2019): 22-35.

Hudson, John. ‘Reading Terminology in the Sources for the Early Common Law: Seisin, Simple and Not So Simple’, in English Legal History and Its Sources: Essays in Honour of Sir John Baker, edited by David Ibbetson, Neil Jones, and Nigel Ramsay (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019): 79-99.

Kamusella, Tomasz. ‘Art and sex in communist Albania’. New Eastern Europe (blog). April 10 2019. Accessed April 27 2019.

‘Bulgaria’s denial of its Ottoman past and Turkish identity’. New Eastern Europe (blog). March 24, 2019. Accessed April 14, 2019.

—‘Estonian Russian: If or when?New Eastern Europe (blog). 8 May 2019.  Accessed 9 May 2019.

Marushiakova, Elena and Vesselin Popov. ‘Цыганские миграции в Кавказском регионе: история и современность’. [‘Gypsy Migration in Caucasus region: history and present day’], in G. Hadzhimuratova & S. Ryazantsev, eds., ДЕМОГРАФИЧЕСКИЙ И МИГРАЦИОННЫЙ ПОРТРЕТ КАВКАЗА/Demographic and Migration Portrait of the Caucasus’ 5, no. 2 (Moscow: Ekon-Inform, 2019): 168-174.

—‘Migration, re-emigration and identities’ change: The case of one Roma group from USSR’. In H.Kyuchukov, J.Balvin, L. Kwadrans, eds., Life with Music and Pictures: Eva Davidová’s Contribution to Roma Musicology and Ethnography,  Roma 06 (München: Lincom Academic Publishers, 2019): 63-76.

McClure, Julia, Amitava Chowdhury, Sarah Easterby-Smith, Norberto Ferreras, Omar Gueye, Andrew MacKillop, Meha Priyadarshini, Steven Serels and Jelmer Vos, ‘Inequality and the Future of Global History: A Round Table Discussion’, Journal of Indian Ocean World Studies 3 (2019): 53-81.

Müller, Frank Lorenz. Die Thronfolger: Macht und Zukunft der Monarchie im 19. Jahrhundert. [Trans. Heirs to the Throne: Power and the Future of Monarchy in the 19th Century]. Munich:  Siedler Random House, 2019.

Murdoch, Steve. ‘”Breaching Neutrality”: English prize-taking and Swedish Neutrality in the First Anglo-Dutch War, 1651-1654’. Mariner’s Mirror 105, no. 2 (April 2019): 134-147.

Peacock, Andrew. ‘Arabic Manuscripts from Buton, Southeast Sulawesi, and the Literary Activities of Sultan Muhammad ‘Aydarus (1824-1851)’. Journal of Islamic Manuscripts 10, no. 1 (April 2019).

Randjbar-Daemi, Siavush. ‘Return of the Ayatollah: Islamic Revolution.’ History Today 69, no. 4 (April 2019).

Roman, Raluca Bianca. ‘Religious Humanitarianism and Fateful Orientations among Pentecostal Kaale.’ American Ethnological Society (blog). March 8, 2019. Accessed March 31, 2019.

Skjönsberg, Max. ‘Adam Ferguson on the Perils of Popular Factions and Demagogues in a Roman Mirror’, History of European Ideas  (online first 2019).

—‘Ancient Constitutionalism, Fundamental Law, and Eighteenth-Century Toryism in the Septennial Act (1716) Debates’, History of Political Thought,  no.  2 (2019): 270-301.