Dr Katie Stevenson awarded Royal Society of Edinburgh Medal

Pic Alan Richardson Dundee Pix-AR.co.uk  St Andrews MagThe School of History is delighted to announce that Dr Katie Stevenson has been awarded the Royal Society of Edinburgh Thomas Reid Medal for 2014.

The RSE Thomas Reid Medal is an early career prize in the Humanities and Creative Arts, which has been awarded to Dr Stevenson “for her outstanding scholarly work on the cultural and political history of late medieval Scotland which has established her as a leading international expert in the field and for her commitment to knowledge exchange.”

PG Amy Eberlin wins Medieval Academy Research Funding

Amy EberlinThe School of History offers warm congratulations to second year PhD student Amy Eberlin who has been awarded a 2014 Schallek Award from the Medieval Academy of America.

The Medieval Academy, in collaboration with the Richard III Society – American Branch, gives the annual award to fund doctoral research on any aspect of late medieval Britain.

Amy’s PhD, supervised by Dr Katie Stevenson, is on the Flemings in late medieval Scotland. Her research forms part of the Scotland and the Flemish People project, hosted by the Institute of Scottish Historical Research.

 Amy will use her award to research in the Bruges City Archives and the Zeeuws Archief. This research which will form a core part of her thesis.

 

Mediaeval St Andrews day workshop – January 2014

On 14 January the School of History hosted a one-day workshop on mediaeval St Andrews. The workshop was organised by Dr Michael Brown, Dr Katie Stevenson and Dr Alex Woolf, and there were thirty participants drawn from a range of disciplines including history, art history, literary studies, architectural history, archaeology and linguistics. Researchers came from the universities of St Andrews, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Stirling, Guelph and Trinity College Dublin and discussion benefited from the input of postgraduate researchers, professional archaeologists, archivists and other scholars.

The workshop centred on four principal themes – St Andrew, the Church, the burgh and the university – and each session was led by an invited authority, Dr Simon Taylor of the University of Glasgow on St Andrew, Prof. Ian Campbell of the University of Edinburgh on the Church, Prof. Elizabeth Ewan of the University of Guelph (and currently ISHR Visiting Research Fellow) on the burgh, and Dr Norman Reid, Head of Special Collections, on the university.

The organisers’ research interests in mediaeval St Andrews emerged after several years of teaching the honours option ME3309 Mediaeval St Andrews, the first fully team-taught honours option available to History students. The structure of the teaching and assessment for this module encouraged Drs Brown, Stevenson and Woolf to consider the present state of knowledge and understanding of St Andrews from its earliest settlement to the years before the Reformation in 1560. While the School of History prides itself on its research-led teaching, it is also important to recognise teaching-led research; the students of ME3309 past and present have been crucial to the inception of this project.

Over half of the workshop participants are contributing to a forthcoming volume Medieval St Andrews: Church, Cult, City to be published in the St Andrews Studies in Scottish History series with Boydell & Brewer in 2015. The January workshop was generously supported by the School of History and the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies.

Dr Michael Brown and Dr Katie Stevenson on BBC Radio Scotland

Recently the Black Dinner of 1440 at Edinburgh Castle inspired a shockingly violent scene in the highly-successful television series Game of Thrones.

Recently the Black Dinner of 1440 at Edinburgh Castle inspired a shockingly violent scene in the popular television series Game of Thrones.

Two medieval historians at St Andrews will feature in the coming weeks on the new BBC Radio Scotland series Tales of a Crimewriter. The series focuses on the ways in which the violent episodes during the rule of the Stewart dynasty in Scotland provide inspiration for the arts in different forms, including opera, novels and plays. On Wednesday 4 December Dr Michael Brown can be heard in the first episode of the series, James I, and on Wednesday 11 December he will be joined by Dr Katie Stevenson in the second episode on James II.

Dr Katie Stevenson’s Erasmus exchange to Utrecht

Utrecht

Drift: the heart of the humanities at Universiteit Utrecht

In mid-October, Dr Katie Stevenson, a late medieval historian in the School of History, spent ten days on Erasmus teaching exchange to Universiteit Utrecht in the Netherlands. Utrecht University was founded in 1636 and is one of the world’s leading institutions. Katie visited the Department of History & Art History in the Faculty of Humanities, based in Drift and opposite the University Library, an ultra-modern facility inside Louis Napoleon Boneparte’s former palace in the city.

While in Utrecht Katie taught late medieval history to undergraduate and postgraduate students and offered an individuele opdracht on chivalry and the Order of the Garter in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century England. Katie also gave a lecture to the departments of English, History & Art History on ‘the Battle for Arthur in Anglo-Scottish Relations, c.1500’.

The School of History at St Andrews offers postgraduate exchanges with Utrecht as part of the Erasmus scheme. Katie is the third visitor to Utrecht from St Andrews; Dr James Palmer visited on staff exchange, and his doctoral student Joanna Thornborough spent several months researching there in early 2013. Click here for more information on the Study Abroad schemes for History students.