Postgraduate Spotlight: Jordan Girardin

jgirardinJordan Girardin grew up in the French region of Franche-Comté, only eight miles away from the Swiss border. He undertook his first degree at Sciences Po in Lyon, where he focused on both Communication and Political Studies. This included a year-long programme at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia where he was able to specialise in 18th and 19th century history. In 2012 Jordan decided to leave France’s gastronomic capital to move to St Andrews and to join the MLitt in Modern History, which he completed twelve months later. He has remained loyal to the School of History, by starting his PhD at St Andrews in September 2013 under the supervision of Dr Bernhard Struck.

Geneva: network hub and Alpine gateway? © Bibliothèque de Genève / VIATICALPES

Geneva: network hub and Alpine gateway? © Bibliothèque de Genève / VIATICALPES

Jordan’s main research interest is the study of networks, particularly in border regions, which explains his general enthusiasm for transnational history. Logically, his PhD thesis examines the development of travel networks and intellectual flows in the Alpine region (1750-1830). His MLitt dissertation consisted of a spatial analysis of transnational interactions in the County of Montbéliard, before and after its annexation by Revolutionary France (1770-1820). Jordan is also a keen historian of the Napoleonic era: his work (in French) on Napoleon’s decisive journey between Grenoble and Lyon during the Hundred Days is available in the Napoleon Foundation’s digital library.

Outside of his doctoral research, Jordan is involved in the Centre for Transnational History as a Communications Intern, hoping to develop the Centre’s visibility in St Andrews as well as abroad as part of the GRAINES Network. This year, Jordan is organising a workshop entitled “Mapping Flows & Visualising Data in the Era of Digital Humanities“. He has also helped to co-convene the Early Modern and Modern History Postgraduate Forum, including running the forum website, and teaches his mother tongue in the University’s evening language programme. In his spare time, besides repeatedly playing The Killers on his ukulele, Jordan likes to keep his Lyonnais and Philadelphian habits alive, always looking for a new restaurant or pub to try among the streets of Edinburgh. Jordan is passionate about travelling and particularly enthusiastic about railways, which is a topic that it’s best not to mention when he is around. You can reach Jordan online on his personal website or on Twitter.