December and January Round Up

News

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Photo attrib. Richard Sanderson, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0

Congratulations to Dr James Palmer, who was won a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship for his project ‘Science and Belief in the Making of Early Medieval Europe‘, commencing in 2018

Dr Katie Stevenson has been appointed to the post of Assistant Vice-Principal Collections

Staff Activity

On 4 January Dr Mara van der Lugt gave the Haydn Mason Lecture at the annual conference of the British Society of Eighteenth-Century Studies; entitled ‘Error or Integrity: Questions of Conscience in the Long Eighteenth Century

Dr Margaret Connolly and Rachel Hart presented the paper ‘A late medieval book and its covers: the Marchmont MS of Regiam Maiestatem and its scribe(s)’ at the Scottish Medievalists conference

On January 23, Dr Sarah Easterby-Smith gave the paper ‘Seeds of Knowledge: A Microhistory of Colonial Science at the End of the French Old Regime’ at Queen Mary’s Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies

Dr Tomasz Kamusella spoke on ‘The Forgotten 1989 Expulsion of Turks from Communist Bulgaria’ at the CRSCEES Seminar Series

On January  27, Dr Chandrika Kaul, presented ‘Scotland’s Imperial Past and Present’ at Rethinking Race in Scotland

Professor Steve Murdoch gave the paper ‘Sir James Spens: British Ambassador, Swedish General & European Spymaster’ to the Crail History Society, and spoke on ‘Scotland and the Thirty Years’ War’ to the Scone and District Historical Society

Publications

John Clark, ‘The Coproduction of Modern Science and the Modern State: To Bee or Not to Bee’ State Formations: Global Histories and Cultures of Statehood ed. by J. Brooke, J. Strauss, J. & G. Anderson, pp. 215-228.

Sarah Easterby-Smith, ‘John Hill, Exotic Botany and the Competitive World of Eighteenth-Century Horticulture‘, in Fame and Fortune: Sir John Hill and the London Life in the 1750s, ed. by Clare Brant, George Rousseau, pp. 291-313.

Carole Hillenbrand, ‘The Holy Land in the Crusader and Ayyubid periods, 1099-1250’, in The Oxford Illustrated History of the Holy Land, ed. by Robert Hoyland , Hugh Williamson.

Tomasz Kamusella, ‘The Arabic Language: A Latin of Modernity?‘, Journal of Nationalism, Memory and Language Politics, (vol. 11, no. 2), 117-145.

Colin Kidd, Gerard Carruthers (eds.), Literature and Union: Scottish Texts, British Contexts.

Elena Marushiakova and Vesselin Popov, ‘Commencement of Roma Civic Emancipation‘, Studies in Arts and Humanities, (vol. 3, no. 2), 32-55.

Workshop ‘Editors and the Editing of Scientific Periodicals, 1760-1910’

Blog written by Anna Gielas

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Photo attrib Aimee Rivers, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0

Today’s scholars and scientists have a crucial instrument in common: the learned journal. Despite its ubiquity in academia as well as our familiarity with it, scholars still know relatively little about the historical development of the learned periodical. A recent workshop at the School of History, organised by PhD student Anna Gielas and Professor Aileen Fyfe, shed light on the founders and conductors of scientific journals as well as their editorial strategies and tactics.

The two-day workshop offered an opportunity to PhD students, early career scholars, and well-established academics to present their work. The event attracted attendants from different parts of Europe, including Germany, Scandinavia and Italy. As the first of its kind, the workshop brought British historians to the table with peers working on the same questions, but with the focus on their own native countries. This contrast guaranteed many insights and even some surprises. For instance, the British scholars were astonished to learn how philosophical editorship could spur the careers of German university professors in the second half of the eighteenth century, because English philosophical periodicals began as commercial endeavours with no links to academic institutions whatsoever.

The papers featured individual case studies as well as general trends and changes in editing throughout roughly a century and a half. In addition, the workshop fostered discussions about the many ways in which editors used their periodicals to reach various audiences and ultimately advance and establish new disciplines. Moreover, the speakers highlighted vastly different editorial tactics. One extreme was a conspicuously open, inclusive approach towards submission (regardless of their quality) because editors had to fill a fixed number of journal pages each month or even each week. The opposite would be editors with highly selective approaches and strong forms of gatekeeping, who defined and perpetuated ideas of what counted as science and which authors as scientists. The speakers showed that strong gatekeeping, as well as open and inclusive editorial approaches to scientific observations, have co-existed throughout the history of the scientific journal, and both approaches have shaped scientific communities.

The individual case studies of British, German and Swedish journals also brought to light a remarkable variety of editorial set-ups: from editorship as a task undertaken by a group of peers, to editors working alone. Month after month, sole editors managed a striking workload such as maintaining international correspondence, translating foreign journal articles, and authoring their own texts. The motives of the individual editors were as eclectic as their approaches. Some of them acted out of idealistic reasons, such as wishing to change and improve existing philosophical methodologies, a motive especially prevalent during the Enlightenment. Other editors became involved with philosophical journals in order to counter their geographical isolation, while a small group of people was only in it for the money.

Every panel led to lively discussions, and the workshop was accompanied by a small exhibition of historical scientific journals from the library’s Special Collections. The stimulating two-day event was made possible by funding from the School of History, and the organizers wish to thank Gabriel Sewell (Special Collections), Lorna Harris, and Dorothy Christie (School of History) for their tremendous help.

November Round Up

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Photo attrib. Harry McGregor, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0

Staff Activity 

Dr Sarah Easterby-Smith gave an evening talk on 3rd October to the Friends of St Andrews Botanic Garden, entitled ‘Botany and the Plant Trade in the Late
Eighteenth Century’

Dr James Nott is quoted in the article ‘Looking back on the dance hall days’ on the BBC Scotland website from 7th October

Chandrika Kaul was a research historian for a programme on Hobson-Johnson and the British Raj on The One Show, BBC 1, on 11th October

Riccardo Bavaj gave an interview on Nazi ideology, the SS, and the Wewelsburg for the documentary series Sacred Sites, a TileFilms production for the Smithsonian Channel. He also gave an interview on “What is the West?” for the documentary series Lógos, a co-production of ARD-alpha, the German documentary channel, and the Catholic Academy in Munich, which also hosted a public panel discussion on the topic on 23rd October

On 24th October, Tomasz Kamusella delivered the talk ‘Imagining the Nation:
Ontological and Epistemic Objectivity’ in the Institute for European Studies,
University of Malta. On 27th October, he spoke of ‘The Forgotten 1989 Ethnic
Cleansing of Communist Bulgaria’s Turks: A Yugoslav Connection?’ for the M.A.
Programme in Humanitarian Action, Department of International Relations,
University of Malta

On 25th October Chandrika Kaul delivered a public lecture on ‘The BBC and
India: War, Independence and Partition’, at the India International Centre, New
Delhi

On 23rd October Professor Richard Whatmore gave a talk at the Cambridge History of Political Thought seminar on ‘The End of Enlightenment: death and
the philosophers, 1776-1809’. He also gave a talk entitled ‘What happened to classical republicanism?’ at the conference Studying the Enlightenment: perspectives from Intellectual History and the History of Philosophy at the University of Lausanne on 28th October

On 2nd November the Financial Review published an article by Professor Andrew
Pettegree entitled ‘Martin Luther: a heedless changer of history’

On 4th November Dr Margaret Connolly gave a paper entitled ‘Private Piety and
the Public Record: Old Books, New Readers, and the Reach of Reform’, as part of the Reformation on the Record conference at The National Archives, Kew

On 7th November Professor Colin Kidd gave the Raleigh Lecture at the British
Academy on the subject of ‘The Scottish Enlightenment and the Matter of Troy’

On 8th November Dr Emily Michelson gave a public lecture at the British School
at Rome entitled ‘Walking Conversionary Rome’

On 10th November Dr Justine Firnhaber-Baker gave a paper, ‘Affective
Government after the French Political Crisis of 1356-58’ at Exclusión y Disciplina
Social en la Ciudad Medieval Europea/14th International Meeting of the Middle
Ages in Najéra, Spain

On 14th November Dr Chandrika Kaul debated the validity of historical
monuments in contemporary Scotland on Time Travels, BBC Radio Scotland

On 29th November Dr Akhila Yechury was quoted in the article ‘Retracing the
country’s forgotten French connection’ on The Hindu website

Publications

Riccardo Bavaj, ‘Life, History, and Political Modernism’, in a forum
on ‘Intellectual and Artistic Responses to Early Fascism—the Historians’
Perspective’, The German Quarterly 90 (2017), No. 3

Tom Dawson, Courtney Nimura, Elias Lopez-Romero, and Marie-Yvane Daire
(eds), Public Archaeology and Climate Change (Oxbow, 2017)

T. Kinnaird, T. C. Dawson, D. Sanderson, D. Hamilton, A. Cresswell, and R.
Rennell, ‘Chronostratigraphy of an eroding complex Atlantic Round House, Baile
Sear, Scotland’, The Journal of Coastal and Island Archaeology (Nov 2017), Latest
Articles, 15 p.

E. L. Graham Allsop,  T. C. Dawson, and J. Hambly, ‘Learning from loss: eroding
coastal heritage in Scotland’, Humanities (Nov 2017), 6,4,19 p. 87.

José Luis Garcia, Chandrika Kaul, Filipa Subtil, Alexandra Santos (eds.), Media
and the Portuguese Empire (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017)

Joanna Hambly, Michael Geoffrey Arrowsmith, and Marcus Abbott, ‘A Digital
Future for the Wemyss Caves, Scotland’, British Caves Research Association
(December 2017): 18-22.

Tomasz Kamusella, Motoki Nomachi, and Catherine Gibson (eds), Central Europe
Through the Lens of Language and Politics: On the Sample Maps from the Atlas of
Language Politics in Modern Central Europe (Slavic-Eurasian Research Center,
Japan, 2017)

Dr Tomasz Kamusella and Finex Ndhlovu (eds), The Social and Political History of
Southern Africa’s Languages (Palgave Macmillan UK, 2017)

Colin Kidd and Gerard Carruthers (eds), Literature and Union: Scottish Texts,
British Contexts (Oxford University Press, 2018)

Elena Marushiakova and Vesselin Popov, ‘Orientalism in Romani Studies: The
Case of Eastern Europe’, in Hristo Kyuchukov and William New (eds), Language
of Resistance: Ian Hancock’s Contribution to Romani Studies (Lincom Europa, 2017):
187-237.

Elena Marushiakova and Vesselin Popov, ‘Rethinking Roma Holocaust: Victims
or/and Victors’, in Thomas M. Buchsbaum and Sławomir Kapralski (eds), Beyond
the Roma Holocaust: From Resistance to Mobilisation (Universitas, 2017)

5th Annual Late Medieval France and Burgundy Seminar

Blog written by Dr Justine Firnhaber-Baker

AudiencephotoThe fifth meeting of the Late Medieval France and Burgundy (LMFB) seminar took place at St Andrews on 1st and 2nd December. The LMFB, an annual, multidisciplinary conference, was originally set up by the literary scholar Ros Brown-Grant (Leeds) and the historians Graeme Small (Durham) and Craig Taylor (York). Different universities host the conference each year and the format often varies, but one constant is that it is a friendly and welcoming venue. A particular purpose of the seminar is to keep scholars in touch with one another’s work and to introduce early career scholars and aspiring students to more established figures in the field.

The seminar attracted many attendants, both from St Andrews and other universities, including Kent, Durham, Liverpool, and Leeds. The presentations kicked off with papers from St Andrew’s own Vicky Turner (French) and Agnès Bos (Art History), who spoke on Saracen princesses and Renaissance Gothic furniture, respectively. Trevor Smith (Leeds) then spoke about a subject of more local interest: the reputation of King David II ‘the defecator’ in French and English literature, while Rémy Ambühl (Southhampton), who did his PhD at St Andrews, revised our understanding of what it meant to be a prisoner of war, with particular attention to Jeanne d’Arc. After lunch, Ralph Moffat (Arms and Armour Department of the Glasgow Museums) explained how plate armour and poll-axes worked to a very attentive audience. The first day finished with Lindy Grant’s exploration of Capetian funerary sites and Charlotte Crouch’s discussion of the reluctance of the comital family of Nevers to carry their bishop to his installation.

SpeakerphotoThe second day of the seminar opened with a roundtable on accessing archives and bibliographies in France. It was led by Agnès Bos (St Andrews), Erika Graham-Goering (Ghent) and Kirstin Bourassa (Southern Denmark and York), but quickly became a lively and extremely helpful group discussion, sharing experiences and resources. Emily Guerry (Kent) then treated us to a reassessment of the iconography of the Crown of Thorns and its translation to the Sainte-Chapelle, followed by Emma Campbell (Warwick) on the theme of cutting in both thirteenth-century literary fiction and material manuscript reality. At lunchtime, the participants went down into the St Andrews Castle mine and countermine, a thrilling if claustrophobic (and cold!) experience. The conference finished with papers by Pierre Courroux (Poitiers and Southhampton) on a chronicle written by a mercenary about a military captain, and Michael Depreter (Saint-Louis — Bruxelles and Oxford) on the participants and interests involved in Anglo-Burgundian treaties of the late fifteenth century.

This year’s seminar was made possible by funding from the School of History, the St Andrews Institute for Mediaeval Studies, and the Centre for French History and Culture. It was organized by Justine Firnhaber-Baker, with the help of Vicky Turner (French), as well Dorothy Christie and Audrey Wishhart (Mediaeval History administrators) and Ysaline Bourgine de Meder and Gert-Jan Van de Voorde (St Andrews and Ghent). Next year, the conference will be held at Liverpool, with Godfried Croenen’s organization. If you would like to be added to the email list or the Facebook group for the seminar, please email jmfb@st-andrews.ac.uk.

September Round Up

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Image attrib. Explorathon, CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0

News

Congratulations to ISHR and SAIMS who are both celebrating their tenth anniversary this year!

Congratulations also to recent School of History graduate Nishant Raj, who is the 2017 “Europe Regional Winner” for the History category in the Undergraduate Awards for his essay, ‘Pork, Power and Protest: Control and Resistance in the Pork Trade in Occupied Shanghai’

Staff Activity

Dr Rory Cox gave a public talk at the L.A. Louver art gallery on the ethics of war. The talk accompanied the exhibition ‘Reign of Fire’ by artist Ben Jackel.

Professor Elena Marushiakova and Professor Veselin Popov took part in the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Gypsy Lore Society and Conference on Romani Studies in University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus with the presentation “Commencement of the Organized Roma Civil Movement”. Elena Marushiakova was also involved in the Academic committee preparing the Conference and presented the Opening Presentation.

Professor Elena Marushiakova, Professor Veselin Popov, and Dr Aleksandar Marinov have presented their ERC advanced grant project Nr. 694656 “Roma Civic Emancipation Between The Two World Wars” at European Researchers’ Night, Explorathon St Andrews

Professor Richard Whatmore presented the plenary lecture ‘Adam Smith and the end of Enlightenment’ at the  University of Palermo conference ‘The Thought of Adam Smith through Europe and Beyond’

On September 6, Konrad M. Lawson gave a workshop tutorial introducing database design for historians together with Roberto Sala entitled ‘Do you need a “base” for your “data”’ at the 5th GRAINES Summer School – ‘History and its Sources After the Digital Turn’ at University of Basel

Professor Aileen Fyfe presented the closing presentation ‘The Social Dynamics and Structural Biases of Peer Review, 1865 to 1965’ at the 8th International Congress on Peer Review and Scientific Publication, which took place on September 10

From 23 to 26  September Professor Elena Marushiakova and Professor Veselin Popov have participated as academic advisers and commentators in the Second Summer School for PhD students of the Network of Academic Institutions in Romani Studies in Prague, Czech Republic

Recent Publications

Rory Cox, ‘Expanding the History of the Just War: The Ethics of War in Ancient Egypt’International Studies Quarterly 61 (2) (2017): 371-384.

PhD Induction Day 2017

Blog written by PhD student Sarah Leith

PhD Induction Day Photograph.jpegShould you have been on South Street on the first Thursday morning of the new academic year, you would very likely have seen the latest intake of history PhD students scurrying towards St John’s House. Everyone was desperate to escape the very stereotypical Scottish weather and, once safely inside, the mediaeval history department did indeed provide very welcome shelter from the dreich and dreary day. St John’s entrance hall also doubled as a space for the students to meet each other for the first time as we all gathered together there before our Induction Day officially began.

The beautiful and imposing Cambo House provided the lucky students with the venue for the School of History PhD Induction Day and we were led to an ornate drawing room, which was to be our base for the day. There we were welcomed by staff and current PhD students: the School of History’s Director of Postgraduate Research Riccardo Bavaj, the School’s Postgraduate Secretary Elsie Johnstone, lecturer Dawn Hollis and two history PhD students, Jamie Hinrichs and Matt Ylitalo.

The first order of the day was refreshment: we enjoyed tea, coffee and a selection of chocolate biscuits, as well as the chance to chat during a ‘Speed Meeting’ session (not to be confused with Speed Dating!). We were encouraged to expand our topics of conversation beyond the weather and the usual ‘Where are you from?’ and ‘What is the topic of your thesis?’ When we had all finished our coffees and had all eventually returned to twenty-first-century North East Fife, the School staff spoke to us regarding ‘Understanding how the School works for you’, which included the varied lecture and seminar series, the Centre for Academic, Professional and Organisational Development (CAPOD)’s and the School of History’s own very useful Postgraduate Skills Training programmes.

Cambo House fun times bloomsRiccardo Bavaj then discussed with us the PhD thesis itself and we spoke to our new friends about what it means to conduct original research and about the process involved with the construction of a project such as a thesis. This talk was followed by a discussion led by Dawn Hollis, Jamie Hinrichs and Matt Ylitalo and we were all encouraged to consider what we wanted to achieve both academically and in our spare time during our three years as doctoral students at the University of St Andrews. All three inspired us and our eyes were opened to all the academic and professional options available to us as PhD students.

The gong then went for lunch and we all assembled in Cambo House’s spectacular dining room. Having been very well fed, we returned happily to the drawing room for the afternoon session, during which Sukhi Bains and Kate Ferris both gave very interesting talks about equality and diversity at the University of St Andrews. When the discussion came to an end, the sun began to shine at last and both students and staff embarked on a tour of Cambo House’s stunning gardens. We then returned to St Andrews far better equipped to start our PhDs than when we had assembled in St John’s that morning.  It was a really enjoyable and informative day and many thanks are therefore due to the speakers and organisers, and also to Cambo Estate, too, for the wonderful food and marvellous setting.

Summer Round Up

News

519qpjslulL._AC_US218_Congratulations to Mlitt student Ashley Atkins and Dr Malcolm Petrie for winning the Royal Historical Society Rees Davies Prize and David Berry Prize respectively!

Congratulations also  to Arthur der Weduwen, who has been awarded the James D. Forbes Prize.  The prize is awarded to a student collector who has assembled a collection of books, printed ephemera, manuscripts or photographs, tied together by a common theme. Arthur was awarded the prize for his developing collection of the everyday books of the Dutch Golden Age.

 

Staff Activity

9781138195837Andrew Pettegree appeared in the documentary Sing, Fight, Cry, Pray: Music of the reformations

The USTC hosted the Printed Book in Central Europe Conference

On July 25, Professor Roger Mason and Principal Sally Mapstone took part in the roundtable ‘Literary Culture in Medieval and Renaissance Scotland: Perspectives and Patterns’ at the International Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Literature and Language

Dr Emily Michelson recommended her favourite neighbourhoods in Rome in the Times Higher Education

On August 24-5, the Spatial History and Its Sources workshop took place

James Palmer was a guest on BBC Radio 4’s Take it to the Brink on August 27

Recent Publications

The Future of Early Modern Scotland Conference has posted its video proceedings online

Rory Cox, ‘Gratian’, in Daniel R. Brunstetter, Cian O’Driscoll (eds), Just War Thinkers: From Cicero to the 21st Century, (Routledge, 2017)

Timothy Greenwood, ‘A Contested Jurisdiction: Armenia in Late Antiquity’ in E. Sauer (ed.), Sasanian Persia: Between Rome and the Steppes of Eurasia (Edinburgh University Press, 2017)

— ‘Armenian traditions in ninth and tenth-century Byzantium: Basil I, Constantine VII and the Vita Basilii’ in I. Toth, & T. Shawcross (eds.), The Culture of Reading In Byzantium: Festschrift for Professors Elizabeth and Michael Jeffreys (Cambridge University Press, 2017)

Bridget HealA Magnificent Faith: Art and Identity in Lutheran Germany (OUP, 2017)

John Hudson, ‘Emotions in the early common law (c. 1166–1215)‘ Journal of Legal History, (38.2), pp. 130-154.

Caroline Humfress, ‘Gift-giving and inheritance strategies in late Roman law and legal practice’, in O-A Rønning, H Møller Sigh & H Vogt (eds.), Donations, Inheritance and Property in the Nordic and Western World from Late Antiquity until Today. (Routledge, 2017)

Tomasz Kamusella, ‘The rise and dynamics of the normative isomorphism of language, nation, and state in Central Europe’ . in M Flier & A Graziosi (eds.), The Battle for Ukrainian: A Comparative Perspective (Harvard University Press, 2017), pp. 415-451.

Dimitri Kastritsis, ‘Legend and historical experience in fifteenth-century Ottoman narratives of the past’ in P Lambert & B Weiler (eds.), How the Past was Used: Historical Cultures, c. 750-2000 (Oxford University Press, 2017) 9781474401012_1

Chandrika Kaul, ‘Gallipoli, media and commemorations during 2015 select perspectives‘ Media History, 1-27.

Konrad Lawson, ‘Between Postoccupation and Postcolonial: Framing the Recent Past in the Philippine Treason Amnesty Debate, 1948’ in Kerstin von Linged (ed.), Debating Collaboration and Complicity in War Crimes Trials in Asia, 1945-1956 (Palgrave, 2017)

Gillian Mitchell, ‘’Mod Movement in Quality Street Clothes’: British Popular Music and Pantomime, 1955-1975’, New Theatre Quarterly XXXIII Part 3 (August 2017): pp. 254-276.

Richard WhatmoreSaving republics by moving republicans: Britain, Ireland and ‘New Geneva’ during the Age of Revolutions History, (102.351) pp. 386-413.